Thoughts on potential jurors

I’m laughing at a couple of my fellow potential jurors. #42 sat next to me (I was #41), a large bulky fellow of the type routinely seen around the marina, doing the “lift this, carry that” type of work. When confronted with questions about “beyond reasonable doubt” and “Would jury duty impede your income?”, his only answer was “Uh?”, except once when he answered “I guess”

#28 explained early on she was manic-depressive, could control herself for a few hours with timely administration of medicine, every 2 hours. Her problems were confounded around men with white shirts and ties (think defense attorney). She also required a special diet that needed refrigeration. The judge and bailiff consulted and she (the judge) announced that a refrigerator would be made available.

#46 was odd. During the day, the attorneys asked three times for anyone in law enforcement. At the absolute end he raised his hand and said he was a retired (30 years) LA policeman, an investigator in internal affairs. He should have known he wouldn’t be welcome on a jury.

At a recess, juror #28 was dismissed by agreement between the judge and attorneys. The big guy next to me wasn’t excluded until the end. There were four others dismissed for obvious psychological problems.

If you can’t, or don’t want to serve on a jury, do everyone a favor and call the number on the summons to say so. You won’t go to jail or get a ticket, but you will be given a firm lecture on civic duty and such, at worst. Just say so and save us all a bunch of time.

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